the process of becoming

a blog for twenty-somethings trying to navigate the world and follow your dreams


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what I’m currently reading

Lately, I haven’t been reading as fast as I was only two weeks ago. This is because 1) I went to visited family, which included lots and lots of social time and not very much reading time, 2) I worked way too much when I got back, and 3) I had an emergency root canal done on Wednesday, and the pain has been debilitating ever since. To the point where reading is annoying (and you know it’s bad when I’m like that).

Despite all the hold-ups, I still have had way too many books waiting for me at the library.

Here’s the typical me: I put books on hold at the library before I forget I want to read them, knowing there are long waiting lists for most of them. When I go to pick them up, there’s usually three or more waiting for me. But on my way out the door, I glance at the new releases the librarians have tempted me with on the end caps and usually pick up one or two of those (my library is special in that is it the only one in our system you cannot request their books on hold and have to physically grab them. Thus lots of new and popular books).

Anyway, here’s my long list of what I am currently reading:

me-talk-pretty-one-day1.  Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

Excellent book of essays. Slow going because it’s located at my work and I can only read it to my clients occasionally. But I have enjoyed it immensely thus far.

2. The Maze Runner by James Dashnerthe maze runner

Of course I am reading this because I saw the movie. Basically, I want answers. And a friend graciously borrowed it to me but unfortunately then the slew of books came in. Another one of my YA-read craze.

unbroken3. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand

So so good. On hold because, again, library books a’calling, but oh so good. My mom borrowed this to me maybe… right before the movie came out. I went and saw it about a month ago, even though I hadn’t finished the book, and the movie did not disappoint. But of course the book has way more depth and I am excited to finish it.

4. Things That Are by Amy Leachthings that are

Since I own this delightful Milkweed Editions book of essays, it is also on hold. But beautimous. (Yes that is a word). I hope to get back to it soon.

you-must-remember-this-web5. You Must Remember This: Poems by Michael Bazzett

Another wonderful Milkweed book, this time borrowed from a friend. So good. It has reminded me that I want to read poetry more often (:

6. On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Bisson immunity

This is a popular Graywolf Press book that just came out that I am super curious about. So far, it’s truly remarkable and fascinating. Definitely not as light as all my YA, but very insightful and interesting. Unfortunately I had to return this to the library yesterday, but I am about halfway through and can’t wait to get it again.

neverwhere7. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

Decided to go with some adult fiction instead of YA! So far it’s super mysterious, so I’m having a hard time keeping up. But I do like it enough to keep reading.

8. Uglies by Scott WesterfeldUglies_new-cover

Another YA dystopian, but one that’s been around for around 10 years. I’ve been meaning to read this for about that long, but forgot about it with all the new releases that are catching my eye constantly. I’m halfway finished and so far I like it but not as much as others in the genre.

So that’s it for now! I’ll probably start another library book tomorrow though 😉

What are you currently reading? 


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book reviews have moved!

Since I was bogging down this 20-somethings blog with book reviews, I decided to become an official book blogger and make a book-reviewing blog. Especially since I am trying to debut in the publishing world and get as organized as possible, I thought this would be better for everyone.

Check it out at The Bookcase Wall.

I will still be posting book-ish posts like what I’m reading or maybe short summaries of recommended books. But this way you don’t need to read reviews of books that aren’t so great (: And now I can focus more on getting the articles and humor posts that you guys want out there.

my reading challengeOh, and this picture pretty much sums of why I need to have a book-reviewing blog. My goal for 2015 was just 35 books and I’m already halfway! I had no idea I was going to be so crazy about reading this year. Maybe its because of this Minnesota cold 😉

Thanks for bearing with me!


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thoughts on The Hundred

the 100

(Source: Wikipedia)

Another YA dystopian! Will it stand the test of trilogies that are making Hollywood? Not so sure.

Honest review! The premise? I just learned it is based on the CW Network TV show, so if that scares you, be warned. I won’t say whether I’ve seen any of the show or not.

100 teenagers from Confinement are sent down to Earth after 300 years of living up in space. The government on the space ship wants to know if the radiation has gone away enough for them to come back to Earth and repopulate. But the only way of knowing is to see if the 100 survive. Follow Clarke, Wells, Glass, and Bellamy through this gripping new dystopian YA romance to find out.

Now that I think about it, it really does sound (and truly is) so so so unrealistic. Um, radiation? Nuclear war? Is Earth really gonna be livable and why wouldn’t they know that through technology? They survived 300 years in space! Also, how do not all of the 100 not die when landing on Earth? Seriously, the amount of details that were stretched and skipped to make this book – and TV series – possible is insane. It’s so unrealistic it’s not worth listing all the details. Just stay away from it if you’re a sci-fi fan (this is not sci-fi) or need a book to be realistic at all in order to enjoy it.

The other downside, if you’re able to look past the missing details of the background and surroundings and the almost-completely-absent explanation of why the way things are the way they are, is that there are four main characters POVs you must follow. Four. And if that wasn’t hard enough, there’s a good amount of flashbacks per chapter that all explain the background emotions and actions of the characters. A little confusing and hard to follow, to say the least. It was hard to differentiate the voices as well, even though two are girls and two are guys.

Lastly, this is not a survival novel. This is a romance, plain and simple. But hey, I’m a sap. This book confirmed that I still fall for contrived, cheesy teenage romance in thrilling environments. It’s true – all the actions the characters made were not from common sense but out of their teenage emotions (some of which drove me crazy by the end). It didn’t make me cry, and I didn’t really feel anything for the characters. No plot, no “survival,” no actual details of what Earth is really like. But oh well, I guess.

But for some reason, the book kept me reading. It went very fast (hardly any background given before the plot just takes off), but I went with it. Goodness, I don’t mean to rant. I just like it and I wanted it to actually work. I want to end by saying that it gave me hope: even when a book isn’t perfect or the “best,” it can still be enjoyed.

Will I read the next two books? Maybe, if I’m in the mood for a quick, YA romance, yes. And I sort of still want to know what happens… but there’s always the (very different) show.


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thoughts on Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West

So many book reviews! I have been on a reading role. 

It’s like, because I’m doing so much processing and thinking, I really need to time to just escape into another world and take a break from my life — a world that I can put down at a moment’s notice. I’ve found that it’s very relaxing and good for me, as long as I don’t make it a manic habit.

I’ll try not to make this primarily a book blog, but bear with me! But also I think reading is therapeutic for the recent college grad – finally something you can choose to do on your own time. However, I am thinking of condensing reviews/thoughts on books into one post per, say, three books. If that would be preferable, let me know!

WickedsmallWe all know Dorothy’s story in the classic tale The Wizard of Oz, but what about the other side of the story? Meet Elphaba, the little green girl who grows up to be the Wicked Witch of the West and discover a gripping tale set in Maguire’s fantastical world of Oz. 

Now, this book is kind of old news, though it’s the popular Broadway musical starring Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth that made this book the rage a few years ago. However, I made the mistake of – ahem – never having seen The Wizard of Oz OR (you heard me) Wicked, the Musical before reading this book. And I say mistake because maybe I would have loved it more or understood it more had I already been introduced to Oz.

I found myself steeped in description and confusing language all explaining a land I have very little connection to. I know the Musical’s songs, yes, but I was banned from the movie as a child and have never made the effort to see it since (something my husband has decided to change). I read it because I was very curious about the story, and the book had been recommended to me.

I found the theme of “what is the true nature of evil?” question from the book’s description to be very intriguing, especially when, as I read on, I found I kind of liked Elphaba. But on a different note, I wasn’t able to like her completely because sometimes Maguire painted her so flat. I felt so many characters lacking and their motivations fuzzy. Much of the book was very confusing. I think overall that Maguire is actually a genius in the background story he came up with for the Witch, but some of it flew right over my head, and his writing style is definitely not for me. I had to read other reviews and answered questions to understand some of the elements it was unclear if he explained (I wasn’t about to go back through the book to figure them all out). A few things did not seem plausible or believable to me, but hey – it’s a magical land called Oz. I’m sure that gives him the right to fuzzy a few things. I’m sure if I read it again I would probably understand.

Lastly, as a disclaimer for those who want, two things: cussing and sexual elements.

Thus, it didn’t make for a kid’s story but was an overall pleasant read for the background of the Wicked Witch of the West. The short-version lesson I learned was that things are not always as they seem, and even the most broken stories can be beautiful.